Philip larkin here theme

The poem does continue, although we are at least allowed to pause.

ambulances philip larkin

How to cite this page Choose cite format:. These images are marred somewhat by the traffic and workmen, and ultimately the town which emerges in the second stanza.

philip larkin poem analysis

This building up of clauses mirrors the building up of the city, its various elements and features. Now, inhe feels ready to say that he has found his "Here", although his feelings towards Belfast had changed in the interim.

Philip larkin poems

When Larkin looks at the town as a whole, the description is not too unfavourable, mainly focusing on the buildings, however when he goes further down and looks at the town on a more personal level, the description is rather more cutting. That is the question of identity that Larkin continued to address in other poems in "The Whitsun Weddings" and elsewhere. Here, there are no people; human influence is entirely absent from the final stanza. Larkin uses language very expressively to convey the solitude of this piece of land that is on the way to nowhere. But finally we move towards the end of the poem, and the outermost edges of the city, and so the sentences become shorter, as if falling away or breaking off. At this stage, Larkin is clearly critical not only of the urban population, but of their consumerist culture. He mentions one or two features that might set Hull apart from other cities, namely "the slave museum" Hull was the home town of William Wilberforce, the 19th century anti-slavery campaigner and its consulates, which would be there because Hull is a port of entry for North Sea ferries coming from continental Europe, but these are mixed in with "tattoo-shops" and "grim head-scarfed wives" as though they are nothing special. Indeed, it seems in the end to become a poem about the abolition of personality, which is subsumed into the landscape. Perhaps no poet has paid such attention—such devotion, one might almost say, of this famously secular poet—to the great elemental phenomena of the sky and the sea. This, again, symbolises the end of the journey. Although most of the nouns are in the plural, the descriptive epithets are so brilliantly chosen that we cannot fail to recognise that these features of the town—and its inhabitants—have been carefully observed even if the observer, as already mentioned, has quietly effaced himself.

As before, he creates a sense of variety; the first line lists four architectural or urban features, while the second line gives us just two, qualified by his characteristic compound adjectives, consisting of combinations of nouns or adverbs and participles.

This is enhanced by the use of iambic pentameter throughout the poem. The same centrifugal impulse is at work in these contrasts, though its expression might be called transcendent or metaphysical.

Here philip larkin poetry foundation

Share this:. For Larkin this is a matter of rejoicing rather than regret, for it offers "unfenced existence". Hull is off the beaten track as far as major UK cities are concerned, and it is indeed something of a surprise to find here a bustling port with its "domes and statues, spires and cranes". His poem "Here" was written some six and a half years after his move to Hull, when he had come to appreciate the city for its peculiarities and its remoteness. He mentions one or two features that might set Hull apart from other cities, namely "the slave museum" Hull was the home town of William Wilberforce, the 19th century anti-slavery campaigner and its consulates, which would be there because Hull is a port of entry for North Sea ferries coming from continental Europe, but these are mixed in with "tattoo-shops" and "grim head-scarfed wives" as though they are nothing special. This continuity of the sentence throughout the poem alludes to the continuity of the wind, making its way across various scenes and locations. The poem does continue, although we are at least allowed to pause. In looking away from the self to the lives of others--the social expression--the poet draws the kind of contrast which serves, very often, only to underline a sense of separation between the self and others. These increase the musicality and rhythm of the poem and, in doing so, emphasize the sensation of movement that occurs throughout. However, there is a final unanswered question posed by this poem.
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