Hunger myths

Like hunger itself, it results from underlying inequities that deprive people, especially poor women, of economic opportunity and security. Educating ourselves about the common interests most Americans share with the poor in the Third World and at home allows us to be compassionate without sliding into pity.

world hunger 10 myths pdf

If the poor were truly passive, few of them could even survive. Our aid is used to impose free trade and free market policies, to promote exports at the expense of food production, and to provide the arms that repressive governments use to stay in power.

This information which is rapidly improving all the time allows us to plan ahead, be prepared with effective strategies and to focus on those most at risk. There are close to one billion hungry people in the world who do not make the headlines and yet they go to bed hungry every night.

Power is so much more than money and guns.

You can help with that. To answer these questions we must unlearn much of what we have been taught. Myth Four: Hunger is contest between rich countries and poor countries. Educating ourselves about the common interests most Americans share with the poor in the Third World and at home allows us to be compassionate without sliding into pity. Enforced poverty in the Third World jeopardizes U. By contrast, small farmers typically achieve at least four to five times greater output per acre, in part because they work their land more intensively and use integrated, and often more sustainable, production systems. So countries with hunger and poverty can increase exports of commodities best suited to their geography. Unjust farming systems leave farmland in the hands of the most inefficient producers. Stay in the loop with Food First! The real culprits are an economy that fails to offer everyone opportunities, and a society that places economic efficiency over compassion. Farmers who already have land. Men participate in our programs and are an important part of this process, as a change in their mindset is needed for this societal transformation as well.

Ending world hunger simply means ensuring that people have enough to eat This is false. Obesity is only a problem for developed countries The obesity epidemic is most commonly associated with high-income nations, but there are almost twice as many overweight and obese people living in developing countries.

blogs about hunger

Nature and natural disasters are to blame for hunger This is false. Myth Four: Hunger is contest between rich countries and poor countries. Even in countries like the Unite States and Canada, small farmers find themselves unable to afford the machinery that need to keep their farms running well.

Increasingly, however, calories and nutrition are diverging as the quality of food in most parts of the world is degrading. We now know who those at risk of hunger are — small landholders, agricultural labourers, many indigenous peoples especially farmers and the urban poor. Myth 6: Hunger is just a consequence of overpopulation. While no one knows the precise number of hungry Americans, available evidence indicates that up to 20,, citizens may be hungry at least some period of time each month. A vendor in New Dehli sells vegetables from a cart. One answer is simply that those profiting from exports typically are large growers, international trading companies, foreign investors, and others who have no incentive to use their profits to benefit hungry people. Myth 9: Too Hungry to Fight for Their Rights Reality: Bombarded with images of poor people as weak and hungry, we lose sight of the obvious: for those with few resources, mere survival requires tremendous effort. The importance of food Eradicating hunger and malnutrition is one of the great challenges of our time. All this points to the disease that is at the root of both hunger and overpopulation: The powerlessness of people who must rely on food that is grown and distributed by wealthy people who have never felt hunger pangs, yet who determine how the land will be used, if at all and who will benefit from its fruits. However, one narrow definition of freedom the right to unlimited accumulation of wealth-producing property and the right to use that property however one sees fit is in fundamental conflict with ending hunger. Efforts to feed the hungry are not causing the environmental crisis. Much rich farmland remains unused, or one harvest is gathered per year when there could be two or three. Those Third World societies with dramatically successful early and rapid reductions of population growth rates: China, Sri Lanka, Colombia, Cuba and the Indian state of Kerala prove that the lives of the poor, especially poor women, must improve before they can choose to have fewer children. The Hunger Project addresses the root causes of hunger and poverty using a methodology that is affordable, replicable and sustainable.

All this points to the disease that is at the root of both hunger and overpopulation: The powerlessness of people who must rely on food that is grown and distributed by wealthy people who have never felt hunger pangs, yet who determine how the land will be used, if at all and who will benefit from its fruits.

However, we now know far more about the issue of hunger, its causes and about those at risk and about how best to intervene, so we are now better equipped than ever before to tackle the issue, if we seriously choose to do so. In most countries with widespread hunger, a few large landowners control nearly all agricultural production sometimes with disastrous results.

Myths about food insecurity

Myth 8: Free Trade is the Answer Reality: The trade promotion formula has proven an abject failure at alleviating hunger. Climate-friendly farming practices are low-cost and especially benefit small-scale farmers and farmworkers, who are the majority of hungry people. Recent trends toward privatization and de-regulation are most definitely not the answer. Reality: Hunger also involves the type of food you eat. The industrial model also ends up accelerating the concentration of control over land and other resources that lies at the root of hunger and of vast environmental damage. Measured globally, there is enough to feed everyone. In both rich and poor countries farmers, workers, consumers feel the impact of this system of international control, through artificial shortages of certain products, through high food prices, through poor-quality goods. But it doesn't seem to work that way. To answer these questions we must unlearn much of what we have been taught. Nearly 2 out of every 5 Hispanic children are poor. More Food? Rich or poor we are all part of the same global food system which is gradually coming under the control of a few huge corporations. This means a supporting small-scale farmers and b making sure that food 'safety nets' are in place to protect the most vulnerable people from hunger. For them, hunger is a daily, sometimes life-long, reality.
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12 Myths About Hunger